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Microsoft Kills Off MapPoint and Streets and Trips In Favor of Bing Maps

Unknown Lamer posted about three weeks ago | from the 90s-time-warp-fixed dept.

Microsoft 174

DroidJason1 (3589319) writes Microsoft has killed off two of its mapping products, MapPoint and Streets & Trips. Both of these services have received their last update and will soon be retired in favor of Microsoft's premier mapping product, Bing Maps. The company has yet to go public with a press release announcing the retirement of these two mapping services, but the Redmond giant has quietly mentioned the fate on both the services' websites. MapPoint was first released back in 1999 and made it easier to view, edit, and integrate maps into software. Streets & Trips was a route planning package. Microsoft is now pushing Bing Maps exclusively.

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174 comments

Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (5, Insightful)

jkrise (535370) | about three weeks ago | (#47404979)

You never know when they will get killed. Same goes for Free Sharepoint, Free Office 365, Free One Drive etc. Get off them and breathe free.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2)

Z00L00K (682162) | about three weeks ago | (#47405005)

Same goes for commercial offerings - you never know when they get killed.

I have yet to see anyone really using the map services Microsoft offers as primary source.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about three weeks ago | (#47405087)

I never knew they had any.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Interesting)

tlhIngan (30335) | about three weeks ago | (#47405195)

I knew of Streets and Trips from way back when - it was one of the earliest available GPS packages that almost featured turn-by-turn.

Way back when GPS was horrendously expensive.

I didn't even know they still sold it - I suppose its advantage was it was offline and had everything or so in one box.

Guess that's why they killed it - people remember it, but didn't realize it was still around - you certainly don't see it advertised anywhere.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about three weeks ago | (#47405721)

HERE Maps (by Nokia) also work offline, at least on Win8 and WP8.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

nonicknameavailable (1495435) | about three weeks ago | (#47406007)

they work offline on nokia phones without windows

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about three weeks ago | (#47406163)

aka, NAVTEQ maps. At one point just about every online map provider was using their data, but have since moved away (Mapquest went to TomTom/Teleatlas and Google went in-house).

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Interesting)

peragrin (659227) | about three weeks ago | (#47405949)

Actually last I looked my mothers job used it. it integrated into the rest of their software package so that addresses and route planning could be done easy.

Not sure if they currently can use it but since bing maps like google maps requires internet connections probably not. Not every where they travel have 2G service let alone 3G.

What gets me is why doesn't google or bing maps have an offline mode?Cache a couple of states or even just counties.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2)

tresstatus (260408) | about three weeks ago | (#47406251)

Actually last I looked my mothers job used it. it integrated into the rest of their software package so that addresses and route planning could be done easy.

Not sure if they currently can use it but since bing maps like google maps requires internet connections probably not. Not every where they travel have 2G service let alone 3G.

What gets me is why doesn't google or bing maps have an offline mode?Cache a couple of states or even just counties.

they do... https://support.google.com/gmm... [google.com]

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Shadow99_1 (86250) | about three weeks ago | (#47406269)

I have long been annoyed by google maps lack of offline mode on my tablet, as my tablet only has wifi and bluetooth for connectivity. Which is good 2G/3G is spotty where I live and 4G does not exist yet, this btw is right next to and within one of the top 300 US cities by population. I don't own a smart phone for the same reason. But get away from internet connectivity and google maps just stops working.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (3, Informative)

Bigbutt (65939) | about three weeks ago | (#47406199)

I have the 2004 version of Streets and Trips. I use it for mapping my motorcycle rides. Unlike google maps, I can set where I spend the night, start and stop times, how much gas cost, how often to stop, and even set weights for various aspects of my trips so it'll pick the optimum route for what I want to do (for instance, Beartooth Pass).

And yea, I thought they stopped making it years ago. I'll have to snag the newest version. My 2004 version has worked just fine since I got it.

[John]

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

fizzer06 (1500649) | about three weeks ago | (#47406497)

I have a version of Streets and Trips from 2006. It won't install on Win 7 64 bit. The 2011 version works.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (3, Interesting)

LWATCDR (28044) | about three weeks ago | (#47406387)

Actually Streets and Trips has a lot of features that Google maps and I bet Bing maps lack for trip planning.
For example you can tell it when you are going to leave, your MPG, fuel tank size, and how many hours you want to drive a day. Streets and Trips will suggest refueling points and stopping points.
I wish the online maps "Google" would put those features in and allow you to push the trip to your mobile device.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405631)

I never knew they had any.

That's 'cos you were using Bing Maps to try to find them.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about three weeks ago | (#47405099)

yea but you can still use them well past the expiration date

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405273)

No, the summary mentions they will be retired soon. I know people don't RTFA, but really, you didn't even RTFS? Wow, so proud to be a member of the ADHD generation!

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Zxern (766543) | about three weeks ago | (#47405289)

Streets and trips was an offline map product, it can be used long after its been retired, it just won't be updated anymore.

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405311)

Provided the activation servers are left on... this is Microsoft we're talking about... and proprietary software companies in general these days. Anything they can do to be more malicious they will.

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405395)

Provided the activation servers are left on...

why? you only need to activate when you install it, not when you use it. and even if you did need to re install it and their activation server was for some reason modified to disallow activations of these products you could still do manual activation by calling them. but i guess you prefer the "its all hopeless! we're doomed by our evil corporate overlords" tagline.

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Bert64 (520050) | about three weeks ago | (#47405789)

And if the activation servers are turned off, who's to say they will be willing or able to activate it over the phone?

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about three weeks ago | (#47406429)

Yeah, no kidding. I couldn't get At&t to provide me with online access to my at&t dsl account yesterday without an activation code that could only be spoken over the specific landline attached to the account or physically mailed to the billing address. A reminent of their ameritech takeover, those dsl accounts aren't actually in their system, but an older one that they can't make many changes to.

Do not expect companies to support older systems, especially when they've stated that they will not support them.

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405645)

If Microsoft Money is any indication, they may release a "sunset edition" which is free and does not require activation.

On the other hand, they do license the map data, so the owner of the map data may not let them do that.

Re: Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405963)

Yeah, that'll work...

"Turn left in 100 yards".

Driver turns left. The sound of glass doors being smashed is heard.

"Huh? Since when is there a bank here?"

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1, Insightful)

ruir (2709173) | about three weeks ago | (#47405681)

Microsoft has no whatsoever interest to contribute to a model that favours a business continuity plan, and quite by the contrary, has they have a monopolist position they have all the interest of breaking such a model to forcing all the believers to upgrade to new and shiniest toy. Despite this, they have lost the battle with Google, and all their twists and tales to promote bing have been pathetic, at least.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405021)

Don't use "online" applications. I'm quite happy to buy my software, but I'm not playing the subscription game or being tied to the internet.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about three weeks ago | (#47405093)

I do keep paper maps as backups. They have the added benefit of not needing batteries.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | about three weeks ago | (#47405451)

The question is how many people actually know how to read a paper map these days. I'll be it's damned few since they don't even teach it in school anymore, let alone how to use a compass.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (4, Interesting)

Bigbutt (65939) | about three weeks ago | (#47406211)

They taught map reading in school? How to read a compass? When/where was this? I learned it in Boy Scouts.

Fortunately us Touring motorcycle riders tend to use paper maps. Unfortunately paper maps are difficult to come by. You have to be a member of AAA to get access to decent maps. Otherwise you're stuck with the Rest Area state maps. Not horrible, I've used them occasionally but they are pretty cheaply printed. Opening the map has it tear at the creases.

[John]

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406253)

The question is how many people actually know how to read a paper map these days. I'll be it's damned few since they don't even teach it in school anymore, let alone how to use a compass.

Does not most normal maps actually look like most online maps. Granted I've mostly used maps for mountaineering and online maps for finding streets in cities. But they seem pretty close, as long as you can find north(and most people can see the sun and/or have a watch...

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406543)

Does not most normal maps actually look like most online maps.

Yes, but, I think Mashiki meant reading a (paper) map vs letting the electronic GPS tell you when to turn where.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405155)

You never know when they will get killed. Same goes for Free Sharepoint, Free Office 365, Free One Drive etc. Get off them and breathe free.

Also Google Docs, Google Drive, Gmail, etc. Get off them as well and breathe free.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about three weeks ago | (#47405221)

You never know when they will get killed.

But Streets and Trips is not free. It's still being killed.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405417)

Are you fucking kidding me? I've have seen WAY more open source projects just wither away and die than I have any software, commercial or freeware, backed by an actual company. Just having access to the source code doesn't mean a thing.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about three weeks ago | (#47405447)

He wasn't talking about source code. He was speaking about free (gratis, not libre) offers delivered by a commercial company.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405505)

We was making a snide remark about the "superiority" of open source software's supposed longevity. I pointed out what a foolish statement that was.

Do try to keep up, junior.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405623)

Fuckwit.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406499)

cry moar faggot

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about three weeks ago | (#47405643)

Ok, so let's walk this through then. This is what he wrote:

Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings
You never know when they will get killed. Same goes for Free Sharepoint, Free Office 365, Free One Drive etc. Get off them and breathe free.

Please tell me how that is related to open source.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405743)

Open source projects don't get killed. They may die, but they never get killed.

Re:Problem with proprietary 'free' offerings (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406489)

Learn to read, you stupid fuck. Look at the very fucking title of the fucking thread, dumbass.

How the fuck a worthless, autistic little shit like you manages to stay alive without the ability to comprehend basic language is a mystery.

I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (5, Interesting)

0xdeaddead (797696) | about three weeks ago | (#47404981)

when they had Microsoft TerraServer running on those sweet DEC Alpha's [microsoft.com] back in 1998. Instead of launching a new and exciting mapping service, they just settled for a minor showcase for SQL Server 7 with a database greater than 1TB.

Talk about a company with zero vision.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405037)

Because upper management there is only concerned with a project long enough to use it to jump to the next bigger project. And, bigger is not defined as more important. It's a project with more employees. When I jumped to Expedia very early in that company's history, it was a pleasure to work there. Importance of a project was based upon the number of customers and/or profit. The goal of making a good product and attracting and keeping customers was pounded into us constantly. At Microsoft, making a profit or making customers happy was never a goal of upper management. I never once heard any feedback from customers. At Expedia, we did constant A/B tests and were told exactly what worked and what didn't. That's how you make a better product.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405049)

Today driving home from work I saw a big fat nigger sow and a tiny little nigger buck. They were walking down the side walk together. At first I thought they were having one of those rare tender mother and child moments. But these were niggers and the she boon quickly proved it. The mammy sow reached down and just started slapping the shit out of the niglet. I cannot say I was surprised and I laughed all the way home.

It seems that the only time any niglet is disciplined is if it angers the mammy or baby daddy. Niglets are allowed to scream and run wild, spreading misery and beniggerment on the suffering world without the slightest rebuke or correction unless they benigger their own wicked mammy. Then the nigger child abuse instinct kicks in, instead of loving correction they get boiling water or beaten to death.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (3, Interesting)

amiga3D (567632) | about three weeks ago | (#47405109)

What really bothers me about carbon based lifeforms such as yourself is not the fact you're a racist idiot but rather the feelings you bring out in me. When I first read your hateful, pointless spew I immediately thought of how to hunt down and kill you to cull your DNA from the herd. I then felt shame for sinking down into the muck with you. Off to take a shower to get the slimy stench off me.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (0)

callmetheraven (711291) | about three weeks ago | (#47405593)

And he's gonna cry, cry, cry, all the way home
all the way home,
all the way home

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406557)

LOL! The puny dork is so angry that it's deluded itself into thinking it has the ability to harm anyone. You're that little ankle biter dog that can't hurt anything, so it just yips like crazy.

So yeah, come "waste" me little guy, it will be adorable to see you try.

Is difficult to parse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405885)

I think that average english speakers in the United States normally different words to describe what I think you are describing... I am surprised how difficult I found your paragraphs to understand. I think if you changed some words, it would be more understandable to the other people here, and it could still be offensive.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406227)

"niglet"? At least use the right words.

A black child was called a "Pickaninny"

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (1)

ruir (2709173) | about three weeks ago | (#47405693)

mod up this anon-my team picked up the system administration duties from another team, and everything was very fucked up, just to be nice. The priorities of the other team was just churning things to show the management and doing their little experiments on the side. Two years later, the stability of the service has been rock solid, however often in a while we still have to clean their rubbish when we point our guns to more obscure services.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405055)

>Talk about a company with zero vision.

You have to remember that Microsoft is an agglomeration of warring fiefdoms [bing.com] instead of an actual company, with whichever VP talks the fastest getting the resources. This really explains every boneheaded thing they've done over the past couple decades.

Re:I'm always amazed MS blew the mapping race (2, Interesting)

callmetheraven (711291) | about three weeks ago | (#47405461)

Bing maps is a ghost town, and rightfully so
I can get embed a LOT of google maps services (actually from two different google map services) for free, with plenty of neat features, and a JavaScript library of extras provided free from Google. OR
I can go to Bing Maps and get NOTHING free, yes that's right FUCK ALL nothing. I can sign up for their expensive service and get their half-assed maps. Fuck Bing maps and their pathetic service, they are an almost-ran and will never be more.

10, 9, 8.... (0)

djupedal (584558) | about three weeks ago | (#47405023)

"Microsoft is now pushing Bing Maps exclusively"

...counting down to the eventual outcry over upcoming changes to BING licensing restrictions that will further profit MS

One might say (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405027)

These apps paved the way for Bing.

Re:One might say (2)

quetwo (1203948) | about three weeks ago | (#47406235)

Mappoint did a lot more than Bing does... And the VPs who think Bing is the answer have no idea.

Mappoint is closer to ArcGIS than it is a consumer mapping applications. It had an extensive set of APIs that you could allow apps to push data onto maps, it allowed statistical queries and it allowed complex boundaries. etc... all back in 2004. Heck, they even had some traffic data built in for their analysis.

I remember when Verizon used on-site Mappoint servers to allow dispatchers to use Verizon phones as tacklers (this was before smartphones), so dispatchers could see where certain trucks were, directions they were going, etc.

Dang. What's next, Encarta? (2)

jpellino (202698) | about three weeks ago | (#47405029)

Oh. Wait.

Re:Dang. What's next, Encarta? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about three weeks ago | (#47405149)

You know what was a really good Microsoft offering, for its time? Microsoft Dinosaurs. And I liked Encarta as well.

The web has largely rendered those sorts of projects pointless from a corporate perspective, obviously. Plus I haven't used Windows as my main desktop OS for 13-14 years.. but still, I have fond memories of those two products.

Re:Dang. What's next, Encarta? (2)

jpellino (202698) | about three weeks ago | (#47405237)

Still use "Dinosaurs". Kids make "life size" dinos or parts by using those diagrams with the scale human and blow them up on a projector to trace on huge art paper and paint / color / decorate. Tough finding a fridge big enough to put them on at home with the rest of the classroom art.

Re:Dang. What's next, Encarta? (1)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about three weeks ago | (#47405281)

Annoyingly, it's not just Encarta. It's seemingly any offline reference title. Grolier's is paywalled to oblivion, Britannica gives the first two paragraphs, Simon & Schuster haven't sold a reference app in years, and Wikipedia is, well, Wikipedia.

Now yes, the internet is how we get data around fastest, and even CDs were a de facto subscription since you'd buy a copy every year or two to stay current. I get that. Where plastic disc media had some usefulness to it was that, for K-12 schooling, it was easier to cite them as one would cite a traditional printed volume. Additionally, even if not the most bleeding edge information, most information contained therein would remain relatively consistent from year to year (especially ones on historical matters; technological matters, less so for obvious reasons). It also provided a baseline with which to compare other sources. If Encarta and Wikipedia disagreed, it'd pose the question of 'why'. Was there some sort of major breakthrough that allows Wikipedia to show its strengths as being an up-to-the-minute, crowdsourced reference, or is the Wikipedia article amidst an edit war? At least with Encarta, there's some semblance of "information freeze" where it's accurate to the point where the disc was pressed, and can be relied upon as such.

Sending reference works "to the cloud" makes sense, until companies paywall the whole thing, you don't know what you're really getting when you fork over your Mastercard, and it causes people like me to wax nostalgic for the plastic disc for well-written, relatively unbiased descriptions of WWII battles.

Re:Dang. What's next, Encarta? (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about three weeks ago | (#47405563)

You are free to download wikipedia and use it locally.

Re:Dang. What's next, Encarta? (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about three weeks ago | (#47405459)

You know what was a really good Microsoft offering, for its time? Microsoft Dinosaurs. And I liked Encarta as well.

Microsoft Dangerous Creatures for the life! Indeed, in general those multimedia CD-ROMs produced by Microsoft were very well executed.

Ya, not surprised (0)

Nyder (754090) | about three weeks ago | (#47405051)

This is what corporations are about. But up the smaller successful offerings so people can use your crappier offerings for a price.

Can Bing give itself directions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405089)

Maybe it can find its way out of obscurity.

What MS needs to do is (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405115)

retire Bing and just use Google. Huh? Am I right!

Re:What MS needs to do is (4, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | about three weeks ago | (#47405573)

Only if Google stop making their map crapper.

They still use the wrong colours for UK roads. Orange, orange and yellow-orange is not a good colour scheme.

The new map interace is slow. I can't just click a "from" and a "to". I have to find the place I want to go.

Re:What MS needs to do is (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405675)

Damn right about Google. Their maps' legibility have fallen dramatically since their last iteration. When I open my local area, the names of roads, lanes, paths, woods, ponds and lots of other cartographic noise are visible, but whole towns and villages are missing. Only one or two villages are visible out of the 20-30 in the area and these are in a lighter font than the damn 10 hectare wood/pond/back-lane next to it. On top of this, odd places are highlighted (far more prominent) even when logged out. I've no idea why the name of a farm business 5 miles away is more important than the 3 000 people living anonymously in the unlabelled village next to it.

Re:What MS needs to do is (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about three weeks ago | (#47405575)

You are right. And needs Linux as the Windows 9 kernel, it's the only way Windows will ever be able to update a program while it's running.

Microsoft can't innovate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405157)

That's my experience with the company in a nutshell.

Re:Microsoft can't innovate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405507)

Indeed. There is always something weird about Microsoft regarding their attempts to innovate, which often end up quite badly. Maybe the company is not well organized for that kind of purpose. I personally am a Change Management Consultant for companies (sounds fancy, but it's basic things like strategy clarification and implementation, operational efficiency, employee wellbeing) and would like to look "under the hood" of Microsoft to pinpoint what causes this problem.

Re:Microsoft can't innovate (2, Funny)

Tough Love (215404) | about three weeks ago | (#47405585)

Microsoft has been very succesful in their attempts to innovate, once you realize that Microsoft has its own private dictionary, and in that dictionary the definition of "innovate" is "extinguish".

Re:Microsoft can't innovate (2)

91degrees (207121) | about three weeks ago | (#47405665)

Well, they came up with the XBox, and established online gaming as a serious thing. The Zune HD was apparently really good, but nobody bought it. MS came up with a completely new UI. Everyone complained and bitched because they removed the "start" menu (which incidentally was another MS innovation).

So they do innovate, but slashdotters ignore it or hate them for it.

How much lower? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405177)

Apple already has huge profit margins. Do they really need to save a few more bucks by replacing Chinese workers/slaves with robots?

I guess shareholders' desire for profit at all costs wins out again...

My mom relies on S&T. (2)

Chas (5144) | about three weeks ago | (#47405181)

She's not going to be happy about this. Not at all.

Bing maps isn't even a poor second to S&T for route planning. Not even an "also ran".

Re:My mom relies on S&T. (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about three weeks ago | (#47405731)

Have you tried Nokia maps? They seem to be more detailed than Bing, and have a more mature navigation mode. They also work offline.

Why don't they use Google maps like everyone else? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405187)

Why oh why don't they just use Google maps like everyone else? Google maps are awesome! Heck even bong could use Google maps. It would be a whole lot cheaper too! I don't know why microsoft doesn't use Google maps. Google knows how to make maps really well!

wow who cares (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405191)

I've been using google maps for so long forgot anything else was out there!

And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (5, Insightful)

wvmarle (1070040) | about three weeks ago | (#47405223)

I for one had never even heard of these products, and I don't think I've ever encountered a web site using it. All I see is Google Maps when sites need to do something with mapping.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (3)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about three weeks ago | (#47405295)

I for one had never even heard of these products, and I don't think I've ever encountered a web site using it. All I see is Google Maps when sites need to do something with mapping.

Well, duh. MapPoint and S&T was a plastic-disc software title, intended for end users to do stuff without an internet connection. See kids, in the days between the joys of attempting to re-fold a paper map and always-on, always-connected internet streamed maps, companies got all the street information together and sold a software release in a perpetual licensing format. People could then take their laptops and a serial (later USB and/or Bluetooth) GPS add-on and navigate with a laptop, without worrying about data plans, cellular outages, or getting stuck on a necessary phone call that brought into question one's allegiance to accurate navigation.

In the case of MapPoint, routes and distances were mass queried and used in tandem with Access and Excel to make geographical and topological data useful in a business context.

Websites are going to use Google maps (or yahoo/mapquest/bing, to a much lesser extent) because their APIs allow embedded maps nice and easily. For folks who need offline information, Google Maps was never intended to fill that space. Now, it seems, Delorme is the sole holdout for plastic disc mapping software.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (0)

wvmarle (1070040) | about three weeks ago | (#47405333)

First of all, I'm old enough to remember a world without Internet, without mobile phones, even without computers (other than the occasional MSX or C64), and have been doing internet banking from the time you had to dial in and use a command line interface (probably telnet) with the bank to get things done.

Yet I still never heard of those products. Maybe they were US-only? Not worldwide?

No matter what, you totally confirm what I suspected: nothing of value was lost. Sure it may have been valuable, but such products long lost their value, being overtaken by much more powerful online solutions.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405371)

Yet I still never heard of those products.

And if you haven't heard of it then it must not be relevant to anybody right? Because you know everything of value.

Maybe they were US-only? Not worldwide?

Oh yet in your infinite wisdom you couldn't spend 5 seconds to find that out? No, it wasn't US-only.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405589)

Streets & Trips was known as Autoroute outside of North America. MapPoint was relatively expensive, and was more targeted at the generation of maps from datasets rather than basic map browsing, so there was little reason to have heard of it unless you were working in that area.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about three weeks ago | (#47405591)

Open Street Map is getting very good.

Re:And, probaly, nothing of value was lost. (1)

Zxern (766543) | about three weeks ago | (#47405301)

Streets and trips wasn't an online service. It was an offline map product. You could connect a real gps to your laptop, load this software on it and you have turn by turn directions way back in the late 90's.

I Use Streets and Trips on RV Trips (4, Interesting)

C0L0PH0N (613595) | about three weeks ago | (#47405291)

I am a retired computer guy, and an RVer. I've used Streets and Trips for the past three years, and have found it invaluable for RV travelling. What makes Streets and Trips work so well for travelers is that it is always there, whether you have Internet or not. And my experience even with a smart phone and hotspot capabilities, is that travellers do not always have access to the Internet. Which renders MS's "Bing" solution useless. And Streets and Trips on my laptop is connected to a printer, so printing out strip maps for the next day is easy. It makes it easy to create long trips, stop by stop, and save the whole route. I'm talking about several months and 10,000 miles of traveling here. I've tried using Google and Bing maps, but actually, the closest trip planning tool I've found that provides for long range planning and in any detail I want is actually Google Earth. But until Streets and Trips is dead, I will be using it. And it sounds like it should work for the next several years.

Re:I Use Streets and Trips on RV Trips (1)

Cyberax (705495) | about three weeks ago | (#47405605)

Just buy Sygic or something like it. It works offline as well.

Re:I Use Streets and Trips on RV Trips (1)

itsme1234 (199680) | about three weeks ago | (#47405723)

Sygic has TomTom (Tele Atlas, well in Top5, maybe Top3 players) maps and is currently on sale ($70 for "World" and about half that for North America or Europe or something like that).

If you want desktop/Win 8 there is Here (Nokia) Maps (again, "top data") - free.

There are multiple usable solutions based on Openstreetmaps (which has fantastic coverage in most parts of the world). Anroid has for example Be-on-road for "full navigation" and Mapswithme for simpler (but much faster) "map browsing" - both free.

Everything mentioned above works (also) off-line and basically world-wide.

The problem is that good programs are out there but somehow people don't seem to find them. I'm sure there are some very good ones I've never heard of even if I read regularly about this. Even starting way back, with the first iPhone (that didn't even had GPS at all, and no 3G and "data" was anyway more expensive and rare than now), with Google Maps that didn't have any "real navigation", no re-routing, nothing - even on technical sites Google Maps on iPhone was given as the best navigation solution. While in the meantime you had "full" turn-by-turn navigation from at least 3 big vendors, offline, some with traffic info (for some countries), some running on phones (with real GPS!), etc. But people (and by that I mean even technical bloggers) just didn't know.

Re:I Use Streets and Trips on RV Trips (2)

91degrees (207121) | about three weeks ago | (#47405673)

I think the problem is that they can't compete with the dedicated units. Garmins and Tomtoms are fairly cheap and fit nicely on the dashboard, and even they're losing market share (or redirecting their business) to built-in systems.

Re:I Use Streets and Trips on RV Trips (2)

swb (14022) | about three weeks ago | (#47406097)

I won't knock what you're doing but I'm curious what you get out of it that you couldn't get out of a Rand McNally trucker's road atlas and a dedicated GPS.

The dedicated GPS would give you turn-turn directions without any data service and the atlas would give you decent printed maps for most highway planning.

As kids in the 70s we covered most of the Deep South and Eastern Seaboard in an RV with just a paper map. I don't remember us getting lost and we sure seemed to spend a lot of time off the beaten path.

I suppose the trip planning part would be OK if you were really compulsive about it, but it seems like a lot of work.

Bing Maps... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405345)

...perfect for the device which is always on-line.

For my excursions with my laptop, which is not always Internet-connected and sometimes gets taken to places where there is no signal, anyway, Map Point is great.

The Cloud -- The Internet Is Everywhere Even If It Isn't.

I don't like the word Bing (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about three weeks ago | (#47405373)

I've never really cared for it, in my area it could be taken for type of a cherry, but of little fact. Now MapPoint that is a search engine name. Google not forgotten with a name selected for what can only be called it's prime directive.

Not forgotten is also the daughter of the mathematician who sued to have that word (Google) back in his memory, I'm sorry but it is a good site name). They did your Dad good, take solstice in that.

The fact Google will control the world in a matter of years should add the cherry. The statement is a matter of the Google glasses that can read Pin Numbers.

@Trax3001BBS - Re:I don't like the word Bing (1)

nukenerd (172703) | about three weeks ago | (#47405987)

Wrote :-

:I don't like the word Bing .... I've never really cared for it

Too right. It makes me think of Bing Crosby [wikimedia.org] , the 1950's Brycreemed guy with jug-handle ears who sings that dreary "White Xmas" song on continuous loop in every shopping mall from about mid-October every year. Otherwise it reminds me of a silly children's board game (can't remember what it's called) where you have to shout "Bing!" or "Ping!" or something like that when you think you have won.

BM = (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405401)

Bowel Movement

...two killed off, (0)

tudorxpopescu (2595289) | about three weeks ago | (#47405419)

one more to go! Microsoft should just kill all mediocre products and focus on the ones that are great. Oh, wait...

Get one thing right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405545)

Better get one product right. I really like the driving instructions Bing creates. But they need to match reality more reliably. I don't have the time to double-check with other material.

Bing is irrelevant (-1)

WinstonWolfIT (1550079) | about three weeks ago | (#47405599)

Without traffic being integrated into travel times Bing is useless. The when of a trip is just as important as the how, especially when navigating using a mobile. Bing will happily send me into a 20-kilometer parking lot, where Google will route me around it and save me significant time. Also, the usability of the site is laughable. Where's the search typeahead?

Re:Bing is irrelevant (1)

91degrees (207121) | about three weeks ago | (#47405611)

Not sure what you mean here. I just tried a route with Bing, clicked "view route based on traffic" and the route changed to avoid a jam.

Free Offers wont last long (1)

topeurobets (3737599) | about three weeks ago | (#47405669)

They are the boss whenever and whatever they want they can simply kill or remove the services.

Bing Maps!.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47405941)

For when you absolutely need to be confused as to how to get there!

Garmin for the win (4, Interesting)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about three weeks ago | (#47405999)

I drive a cab in the metro NY City area, a dedicated GPS is the right tool for my job. GARMIN MV3590 LMT (Lifetime Maps/Traffic) is my reccomendation. I have no time to screw around with online maps and their inherent issues, I need to get where my fares need to be. AA quality, updated GPS does this.

Crack open your wallet and spend $300 on this Garmin and you'll have noticed you have less problems, and the voice recognition software gets it right over 90% of the time.

I now I'm a niche segment here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47406381)

But my company uses streets and trips or delorme to mark out our day, quicker and less messy/confusing then a paper map.

Let me explain, we do dig safe locates, thus every day is different going to 20-40 different locations in a 2-5 city area every day. After a while even erasing those marks on a paper map leave it messy and difficult to tell what an old mark vs new mark is. never mind smudges or dealing with the edge of map areas.

Add in a gps unit to the lap top an d you get a great 'you are here" beacon. helping you determine your route (the route given isn't always right or you just need to go in a different order then the program came up with.

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